Web Pages

Be­low is a list of rel­e­vant web pages.

1.
chemguide.co.uk

Jim Clarke's UK site with lots of solid info.

2.
Cit­i­zendium

The Cit­i­zen’s Com­pendium. Had a rather good write up on the quan­ti­za­tion of the elec­tro­mag­netic field.

3.
El­ster’s lec­ture notes

Pro­fes­sor El­ster gives a very help­ful his­tor­i­cal overview of the me­son ex­change po­ten­tials, (fewblect_2.pdf). She also gives the de­tailed po­ten­tials for scalar and vec­tor mesons that the other ref­er­ences do not, (fewblect_1.pdf).

4.
ENSDF data

The Nu­clear Data Sheets are an au­thor­i­ta­tive and com­pre­hen­sive data source on nu­clei. The cor­re­spond­ing
Nu­clear Data Sheets poli­cies
have been used re­peat­edly in this book to de­cide what con­ven­tions to take as stan­dard.

5.
Richard P. Feyn­man: No­bel Prize lec­ture

De­scribes the de­vel­op­ment of Feyn­man’s path in­te­gral ap­proach to quan­tum elec­tro­dy­nam­ics.

6.
Hy­per­physics

Gives sim­ple ex­pla­na­tions of al­most any­thing in physics. An ex­ten­sive source of info on chem­i­cal bonds and the pe­ri­odic ta­ble.

7.
ICC pro­gram

Pro­gram to com­pute in­ter­nal con­ver­sion co­ef­fi­cients.

8.
J. Jäckle

This web site in­cludes a good de­scrip­tion of the Peltier and See­beck ef­fects.

9.
R.D. Klauber’s ped­a­gog­i­cal quan­tum field the­ory

This web site gives a fully ex­plained de­scrip­tion of quan­tum field the­ory.

10.
Mayer, M. Goep­pert: No­bel Prize lec­ture

An ex­cel­lent in­tro­duc­tion to the shell model of nu­clear physics writ­ten for a gen­eral au­di­ence is found in the lec­ture.

11.
NIST data

Au­thor­i­ta­tive val­ues of phys­i­cal con­stants from NIST.

12.
NuDat 2 data­base

Ex­ten­sive in­for­ma­tion about nu­clei pro­vided by the Na­tional Nu­clear Data Cen­ter.

13.
Pur­due chem­istry re­view

Gen­eral chem­istry help.

14.
Quan­tum Ex­change

Lots of stuff.

15.
Rain­wa­ter, J.: No­bel Prize lec­ture

An in­tro­duc­tion to dis­torted nu­clei writ­ten for a gen­eral au­di­ence is found in the lec­ture.

16.
An­thony Stone’s Wigner co­ef­fi­cient cal­cu­la­tors

The cal­cu­la­tor on this site gives ex­act val­ues for the Wigner 3j, 6j, and 6j sym­bols. The 3j sym­bols are read­ily con­verted to Cleb­sch-Gor­dan co­ef­fi­cients, {N.13}.

17.
David Tong’s notes on quan­tum field the­ory

Very help­ful, es­pe­cially in con­junc­tion with Pe­skin & Schroeder, [34].

18.
T. Tritt

Ther­mo­elec­tric ma­te­ri­als: prin­ci­ples, struc­ture, prop­er­ties, and ap­pli­ca­tions. From En­cy­clo­pe­dia of Ma­te­ri­als: Sci­ence and Tech­nol­ogy. El­se­vier 2002.

19.
TUNL Nu­clear Data Eval­u­a­tion Group

Ex­ten­sive data on light nu­clei from $A$ $\vphantom0\raisebox{1.5pt}{$=$}$ 3 to 20.

20.
Uni­ver­sity of Michi­gan

In­valu­able source on the hy­dro­gen mol­e­cule and chem­i­cal bonds. Have a look at the an­i­mated pe­ri­odic ta­ble for ac­tual atom en­ergy lev­els.

21.
Wikipedia

Prob­a­bly this book’s pri­mary source of in­for­ma­tion on about every loose end, though some­what un­even. Some great, some con­fus­ing, some overly tech­ni­cal.